Brig. Gen. Charles Ewing
 
Born:   March 6 1835, Lancaster Ohio
Died:   June 20 1883, Washington DC
Buried:   Arlington National Cemetery Arlington Arlington County Virginia
Plot:   Section 4, Grave 5563 ES
 
Pre-War Profession Lawyer
 
War Service  May 1861 Capt. in 13th US Infantry, Vicksburg campaign (w), Lt. Col. on Sherman's staff, Chattanooga, Atlanta campaign, March to the Sea, Carolinas campaign, March 1865 appointed Brig. Gen. of Volunteers.
 
Brevet Promotions Maj. Gen. U.S.V. March 13 1865.
 
Notes Brother of Hugh and Thomas Ewing Jr.
 
Charles Ewing was an attorney and Union Army general during the American Civil War. He was the son of Interior Secretary Thomas Ewing, the brother of Thomas Ewing, Jr. and Hugh Boyle Ewing, and the foster brother & brother-in-law of William T. Sherman. Ewing's sister and Sherman's wife was Ellen Ewing Sherman.
 
Early life and Career
 
He was educated at the Dominican College, and at the University of Virginia. He studied law, was admitted to practice and was so engaged at St. Louis, Missouri, when the civil war occurred.
 
Civil War
 
He then joined the U.S. Army and was commissioned in 1861 captain in the 13th infantry, of which William T. Sherman, his brother-in-law, was colonel, and was appointed inspector-general on the staff of General Sherman, when in command of the western army.

At the Battle of Vicksburg he planted the flag of his battalion on the parapet of the Confederate fort, and received in the accomplishment a severe wound. For this action he was brevetted major in 1863; for his action at Jackson, Colliersville and Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta campaign he was made lieutenant-colonel by brevet in 1864, and for gallant conduct in the march to the sea and thence through the Carolinas to Washington he was brevetted colonel in 1865. He was made brigadier-general of volunteers, March 8, 1865.
 
Postbellum career
 
In 1867 he resigned his commission in the army, and opened a successful law practice in Washington, D.C., where he died June 20, 1883.
 
Photograph by Artist Margaret A. Rogers.